“We are plagued by drought and science says, we must not accuse nature but man…”

The more things change the more they stay the same.
h/t Tallbloke

My Garden Pond

“… who, by altering the surface of the earth has changed the course of the atmosphere and thence the influence of the seasons.”  Antoine-Alexis Cadet de Vaux, “Observation sur la sécheresse actuelle, ses causes, et les moyens de prévenir la progression de ce fléau,” Moniteur Universel, 26 August 1800.

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Imagine What Would Happen If We Didn’t Have A Strong El Niño For 4 More Years

1883 pops up again.

Watts Up With That?

This is a cross post of my post titled El Niño-Southern Oscillation Then and Now.

I’m presenting this for those who look for patterns. I see it only as a curiosity—nothing more. I am not suggesting that future ENSO events will mimic those of the past, but…

El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices are used to monitor the strength, frequency and duration of El Niño and La Niña events. One of the commonly used indices is the sea surface temperature anomalies of an area in the east-central equatorial Pacific called the NINO3.4 region (5S-5N, 170W-120W). A blogger recently advised me in a comment of a curious agreement in the NINO3.4 data for two periods separated by more than 100 years. Thanks, Bob. That is, the sea surface temperature anomalies of the NINO3.4 region for the period of January 2004 to March 2013 are quite similar to those from January 1883…

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El Niño-Southern Oscillation Then and Now

Again 1883 comes up. Hmm.

Bob Tisdale - Climate Observations

I’m presenting this for those who look for patterns. I see it only as a curiosity—nothing more.  I am not suggesting that future ENSO events will mimic those of the past, but…

El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices are used to monitor the strength, frequency and duration of El Niño and La Niña events. One of the commonly used indices is the sea surface temperature anomalies of an area in the east-central equatorial Pacific called the NINO3.4 region (5S-5N, 170W-120W). A blogger recently advised me in a comment of a curious agreement in the NINO3.4 data for two periods separated by more than 100 years. Thanks, Bob.  That is, the sea surface temperature anomalies of the NINO3.4 region for the period of January 2004 to March 2013 are quite similar to those from January 1883 to March 1892. Refer to Figure 1, which presents NINO3.4 anomaly data for the two periods…

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1883 on ENSO

In response to the question below Bob Tisdale has looked at ENSO Analogues for ~SC14 (linked after jump)

Bob on April 22, 2013 at 11:56 pm

Dear Bob,In response to your post “ENSO 2013 – Boy or Girl?” at wattsupwiththat.com, I have been researching analogue ENSO sequences for this year. I found one, so thought you might like to expand on it (maybe another thought provoking post?).

Present: Monthly Nino 3.4 series Jan 2004 – March 2013
Analog: Monthly Nino 3.4 series Jan 1883 – March 1892

Will the present follow the analog series out to 1895?

http://bobtisdale.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/a-different-perspective-of-the-equatorial-pacific-and-enso-events/#comment-10855