Watch “Exploring Jupiter’s Magnetic Field” on YouTube

This should bring up some surprises!

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Your vote is crucial because it won’t count

OffGuardian

As the  polls taken by now indicate, the UK public is almost evenly split between those in favour of staying in the EU and those who want Britain to leave: 51% to 49%.   While we await for the final official results of this referendum, here’s Jonathan Cook’s blogpost about what your vote, if you are in the UK, will mean.

Here is a prediction about the outcome of today’s UK referendum on leaving the European Union. Even in the unlikely event that the remain camp loses, the UK will still not Brexit. Europe’s neoliberal elite will not agree to release its grip on a major western nation. A solution will be found to keep the UK in the union, whatever British voters decide. Which is one very good reason to vote Brexit, as I’ll explain in a minute.

It has been hard to find much commentary, even in the most liberal…

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From JPL: “Small Asteroid Is Earth’s Constant Companion”

Science Springs

NASA JPL Banner

JPL-Caltech

June 15, 2016
DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown / Laurie Cantillo
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726 / 202-358-1077
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov / laura.l.cantillo@nasa.gov

1
Asteroid 2016 HO3 has an orbit around the sun that keeps it as a constant companion of Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A small asteroid has been discovered in an orbit around the sun that keeps it as a constant companion of Earth, and it will remain so for centuries to come.

As it orbits the sun, this new asteroid, designated 2016 HO3, appears to circle around Earth as well. It is too distant to be considered a true satellite of our planet, but it is the best and most stable example to date of a near-Earth companion, or “quasi-satellite.”

“Since 2016 HO3 loops around our planet, but never ventures very far away as we both go around the sun, we refer to it as…

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Gavin Schmidt: Brexit would lead to more than street killings of MPs

Shub Niggurath Climate

Yesterday British MP Jo Cox was killed by an attacker while going about meeting people in her constituency. The shocking incident set off a train of thoughts in Gavin Schmidt, who is from Britain.

A sudden crisis nearly always brings out hidden currents, which may have otherwise never surfaced. In his string of tweets Schmidt appears to blame ‘Brexit’ for the killing. His tweets followed the incident so closely in time there was no reliable information on motive.

The only possibility, then, is Schmidt was influenced by early reports that said the killer shouted “Britain first!” or the Guardian’s Polly Toynbee who wrote a long article squarely laying the blame for the murder at Brexit’s feet.

Schmidt pulls the trick climate activists have been resorting to, for decades:

schmidt copy

This is an incredible giveaway, isn’t it? Here we have an activist climate scientist, in the throes of a heated crisis…

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Internet censorship and whither shall we go?

The slow death of freedom from thousands of tiny censored cuts

Pointman's

This article is well ahead of what I think is the curve, but I think it gives people fair warning of what’s coming at them, and perhaps some time to start digging in before it arrives. Take it or leave it, as you wish, but you’ve been warned.

As a lone blogger who writes to a very defined objective and on the usual bloated skeptic budget courtesy of Big Oil, I’m obliged to do my own PR to get my content out into the wider world by placing links in various distribution mediums. Facebook is one of my output mediums like Twitter or Reddit that automatically get a link when anything is published here, but quite frankly as far as I could see it never brought in much in the way of new readers.

If anything, the reverse seemed to be true. People read something here and put a link to…

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From phys.org: “Second layer of information in DNA confirmed”

Science Springs

physdotorg
phys.org

June 8, 2016
Erik Arends

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The rigid base-pair model is forced, using 28 constraints (indicated by red spheres), into a lefthanded superhelical path that mimics the DNA conformation in the nucleosome. Credit: Leiden Institute of Physics

Leiden theoretical physicists have proven that DNA mechanics, in addition to genetic information in DNA, determines who we are. Helmut Schiessel and his group simulated many DNA sequences and found a correlation between mechanical cues and the way DNA is folded. They have published their results in PLoS One.

When James Watson and Francis Crick identified the structure of DNA molecules in 1953, they revealed that DNA information determines who we are. The sequence of the letters G, A, T and C in the famous double helix determines what proteins are made ny our cells. If you have brown eyes, for example, this is because a series of letters in your DNA encodes…

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A “Reverse Maastricht” Process

Frank Davis

H/T Rose for this BBC report:

Pro-Remain MPs are considering using their Commons majority to keep Britain inside the EU single market if there is a vote for Brexit, the BBC has learned.

The MPs fear a post-Brexit government might negotiate a limited free trade deal with the EU, which they say would damage the UK’s economy.

There is a pro-Remain majority in the House of Commons of 454 MPs to 147.

A Vote Leave campaign spokesman said MPs will not be able to “defy the will of the electorate” on key issues.

The single market guarantees the free movement of goods, people, services and capital.

The BBC has learned pro-Remain MPs would use their voting power in the House of Commons to protect what they see as the economic benefits of a single market, which gives the UK access to 500 million consumers.

Staying inside the single market…

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Record-breaking Arctic Tern migration revealed

National Trust Press Office

Electronic tags fitted to one of the world’s smallest seabirds have revealed record-breaking migration distances.

A study carried out by scientists at Newcastle University for BBC’s Springwatch has mapped for the first time the incredible annual migration of Arctic Terns from the Farne Islands on the Northumberland coast.

The Farne Islands, Northumberland. The Farne Islands has 23 nesting species of seabird, including thousands of puffins. (c) National Trust Images/John Millar

Weighing just 100g the Arctic Tern has the longest migration of any bird, travelling all the way to Antarctica for the winter and back to the Farnes, which are owned and managed by the National Trust, to breed in the Spring.

Last year 29 birds were fitted with geolocators by local researchers from Newcastle University watched by Springwatch presenter Nick Baker and National Trust rangers. The first of the Terns arrived back in the Farnes this spring.

One bird was found to have made…

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