Watch “How Big Oil Conquered the World” on YouTube

Misdirection is a form of deception in which the attention of an audience is focused on one thing in order to distract its attention from another.
[…]
There are two basic ways to “misdirect” your audience; one is time-sensitive, the other isn’t.

The time-sensitive approach encourages the audience to look away for a fleeting moment, so that the sleight or move may be accomplished undetected.

The other approach has much to do with re-framing the audience’s perception, and perhaps very little to do with the senses. The minds of the audience members are distracted into thinking that an extraneous factor has much to do with the accomplishment of the feat, whereas it really doesn’t have any bearing on the effect at all. “The true skill of the magician is in the skill he exhibits in influencing the spectators mind.” (Dariel Fitzkee, Magic by Misdirection, pg. 33, copyright 1975).

#ExxonKnew *coughs*

The real reason why the media hates Nigel Farage – Breitbart

Dellers picks up on the recent Spiked Farage interview. The parallels with the climate change debate are uncanny.

‘All through the civilisation of human beings, people form establishments’, he says: ‘An interwoven network that actually has a very big generational context, in that it hands on down. And we are challenging the establishment — we are challenging their very thought; we are challenging the very basis upon which they exist and operate. And there is nobody in history who has taken on the establishment and has not received the kind of treatment I am getting.’

[…]

All of this makes perfect sense to me, not only because of what I have personally seen of the way Farage in particular and UKIPers generally are traduced in the media, but also because it gels so perfectly with what is going on right now in the parallel world of the climate change debate. Farage is the political equivalent of those outlying scientists described by Thomas Kuhn in his Structure of Scientific Revolutions: the ones whose reward for challenging the cosy consensus is to be vilified and excluded by an Establishment which dare not admit that it is wrong because that would be to lose its power, its money and its grip on the prevailing culture.

Farage makes this connection explicit when he talks about environmentalism:

The politics of environmentalism is utterly hostile to progress, he says. ‘If Natalie Bennett won the election, we’d all be living in caves’, he says with a chortle. ‘[This politics] is very regressive. There is nothing progressive in terms of the evolution of society or living standards in what these people stand for. And the whole thing is based on a fallacy: that our fossil fuels are going to run out and therefore we have to adapt the way we live. Actually, the shale-gas [revolution] has shown over the past decade that we are finding more and more of this stuff.’ As for the idea that we should stop digging for coal or shale or uranium and instead turn to renewable energy — ‘I think wind energy is the biggest collective economic insanity I’ve seen in my entire life. I’ve never seen anything more stupid, more illogical, or more irrational.’

Here, Farage is kicking against one of the key planks of 21st-century consensus politics: the idea of planetary vulnerability and human hubris. And he gets massive flak for it. ‘[Climate change] is like a religion’, he says. ‘And you’re demonised if you question it. Ostracised completely. Johnny Ball. Think Of A Number. Brilliant man. He compares the amount of CO2 we produce in the whole atmosphere to a ping-pong ball in the Albert Hall, and he is completely ostracised for years. We’re almost back to Galileo. Whether it’s Galileo or Darwin, you challenge consensus, whether it’s in science, whether it’s in politics, and you are demonised for doing it.’ He remembers, in 2006, being on a Sunday morning TV show and being branded a ‘DENIER! DENIER!’ (his emphasis) after he raised issues with climate-change orthodoxy. ‘I thought I was attending the Salem witch trials. Quite extraordinary.’

via The real reason why the media hates Nigel Farage – Breitbart.

Earth Hour ‘Darkness turning away the light’

While more than a billion people participate by shutting off their lights for an hour — and saving at most the equivalent of China halting its CO2 emissions for fewer than four minutes — 1.3 billion people across the developing world will continue to live without electricity as they do every other night of the year.

Almost 3 billion people still burn dung, twigs and other traditional fuels indoors to cook and keep warm. These fuels give off noxious fumes that are linked to 4.3 million deaths each year, mostly women and children.In fact, it was the advent of widespread electrical power that freed us from these harmful practices that still affect large parts of the developing world.

Celebrating darkness signals a turn away from an ever brighter future. 

Bjorn Lomborg, USA Today

http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2014/03/27/bjorn-lomborg-earth-hour-electricity-column/6975265/

A Holistic Energy Approach: Use whatever works

image
Realistically each nation should be dispassionately  evaluating their resources utilising a considerate, realistic approach to the environmental, social and economic impact energy extraction will have – encompassing all elements in the spectrum just as long as no bio fuels are involved. Feeding people with the technology and transport systems we have evolved is a gift not a curse. As it is the polarised lobbying from all vested sundry of the debate create a pea soup media fog.

Continue reading