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Extreme Weather in 1759

A diary recording Bath’s weather, written by a clergyman about 250 years ago, has been found by archivists.

 

The parchment notebook belonged to Reverend Duel Taylor whose tiny writing recorded the city’s weather every day for six years between 1756 and 1761.

 

An entry in December 1759 shows extreme weather was not unusual with the the river “frozen so hard” people had to “walk across it for three days past”.

 

It was found among papers of Bath’s town clerks.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-28170538

The Central England Temperature for December 1759 was 2.5C, about -2.1C below the 1961-1990 average.

h/t JunkScience

In the August sky

Originally posted on Blackhawk Paranormal Investigations :

IN THE SKY DURING AUGUST

August will be a very special month to enjoy the night sky. The nights will be rapidly lengthening, and cold fronts will start to occur giving us more clear skies for observing. There will also be two interesting conjunctions, or close pairings, to enjoy. The first one involves the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter that will be very close together before dawn on the morning of August 18. Remember that Jupiter had been in the evening sky until early July. Since then, it has moved quickly past the Sun from our vantage point and into the morning sky. Jupiter should become visible during the second week of August to the lower left of Venus. It will climb rapidly higher and closer to Venus until it passes Venus on August 18. After that day Jupiter will continue to move higher and away from Venus.

K10Aphrodite

(…

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The Universe may not be expanding, says astrophysicist

Originally posted on nothing theory:

Ever thought: what if the Universe wasn’t expanding? What about the Doppler Effect, then? Well, Theoretical astrophysicist Christof Wetterich says there is a different way as to why we are seeing what the normal effect would do to the affected.

Roger Highfield writes at Telegraph.co.uk,

Because the frequency or “pitch” of light increases with mass, Prof Wetterich argues that masses could have been lower long ago. If they had been constantly increasing, the colours of old galaxies would look red-shifted – and the degree of red shift would depend on how far away they were from Earth. “None of my colleagues has so far found any fault [with this],” Wetterich says.

Prof Wetterich takes the detached, even playful, view that his work marks a change in perspective, with two different views of reality: either the distances between galaxies grow, as in the traditional balloon picture, or the size…

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Vantablack – A Material Too Black To See

Originally posted on DUMMR.com:

vantablack-sAccording to The Independent -

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss. Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

Continue reading HERE.

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Rosetta spacecraft nears ‘rubber ducky’ comet

Originally posted on Global News:

TORONTO – It’s not Bruce Willis landing on an asteroid, but it’s still pretty exciting.

On Aug. 6, the Rosetta spacecraft, a joint mission by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) will reach its final destination: Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which is also being nicknamed the “rubber duckie” comet based on recent images.

As of Tuesday, Rosetta was about 2,000 km from the icy body.

READ MORE: NASA prepares for comet that will narrowly miss Mars

This isn’t any run-of-the-mill mission: Rosetta will be the first mission to actually send a probe to hitch a ride on the comet.

Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko imaged on 20 July 2014 by Rosetta's OSIRIS narrow angle camera from a distance of about 5,500 km. Based on the this image, many are calling this the "rubber duck" comet. Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko imaged on 20 July 2014 by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow angle camera from a distance of about 5,500 km. Based on…

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Why Is Wal-Mart Preparing For A Major Earthquake On The New Madrid Fault?

Originally posted on TheSurvivalPlaceBlog:

By Michael Snyder

Buried in a Wall Street Journal article from about a week ago was a startling piece of information.  According to a Wal-Mart executive, Wal-Mart “participated in an exercise to prepare for an earthquake on the New Madrid fault line” earlier this summer.  And officials at the U.S. Geological Survey have just released a report which indicates that they believe that the New Madrid fault zone has the “potential for larger and more powerful quakes than previously thought“.  So should we be concerned?  Do they know something that we don’t?  The USGS also says that the frequency of earthquakes in the central and eastern portions of the United States has quintupled over the past 30 years, and that significant earthquakes have started popping up in areas of the country that were once extremely quiet.  Along with the new report, the USGS released the following…

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5 Everyday Weeds That You’ll Want in an Emergency

craigm350:

Dandelions mean spring to me and are a lovely sight – on someone else’s lawn!

Originally posted on TheSurvivalPlaceBlog:

Weeds_final

 By Commmon Sense Prepper

Our lawns and gardens are invaded every year by pesky weeds, and local watering holes and fishing spots can have their shores completely blocked by pervasive plant growth. We’ve developed endless varieties of chemicals, lawn treatment plans, and special weed removal tools to combat these ever-present menaces. But in many ways, we’ve actually been fighting a grand battle against some of the best readily available food and medicine sources! Far from being pests, these weeds were once considered valuable by our ancestors and were harvested for food, medicine, and even bandages. Let’s relearn the “herb lore” of the common weeds, so that you’ll have those resources close at hand.

5.  The Dandelion

Stubborn, annoying...and more useful than you may think!

I cannot imagine a more hated weed in any suburban yard. Clover and other plants at least have the decency to blend in with that soft carpet of green but the dandelion stands tall…

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Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space

Originally posted on SelfAwarePatterns:

I have to say that I had no idea this was still being debated: Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space.

In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object.

But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really crossed the threshold continues. There are some scientists who say that the spacecraft is still within the heliosphere – the region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles – and has not yet reached the space between the stars.

Now, two Voyager team scientists have developed a test that they say could prove once and for all if Voyager 1 has crossed the boundary. The new test is outlined in a study accepted…

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June 2014 Global Surface (Land+Ocean) and Lower Troposphere Temperature Anomaly Update

Originally posted on Bob Tisdale - Climate Observations:

Sorry this update is late.  I got sidetracked with the post about Risbey et al. (2014), and the post about the new climate model, now with knobs.

This post provides an update of the data for the three primary suppliers of global land+ocean surface temperature data—GISS and NCDC through June 2014 and HADCRUT4 through May 2014—and of the two suppliers of satellite-based lower troposphere temperature data (RSS and UAH) through June 2014.

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WOW! – How Many Fabrications, Misrepresentations, etc., Can One Blogger Roll into One Blog Post?

Originally posted on Bob Tisdale - Climate Observations:

I always find Sou’s (a.k.a. Miriam O’Brien) posts at HotWhopper entertaining.   She normally is only capable of the Monty Python contradiction approach to argument.  When you read her posts in a Monty Python-light, they are very funny. Try it.  But in her recent post James Risbey and co: Another perspective on surface temperature observations and climate models Miriam has risen to new heights of misinformation.   That post was her “rebuttal” to my post Lewandowsky and Oreskes Are Co-Authors of a Paper about ENSO, Climate Models and Sea Surface Temperature Trends (Go Figure!).  It didn’t take long to understand what she had done.  She couldn’t counter my primary arguments (and if you’re wondering what they were, read the closing of my post), so Miriam just made stuff up.  I started to count the number of blatantly obvious fabrications, untruths, falsehoods, misrepresentations, etc., but then soon realized it would be better…

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