The Guardian’s ‘ursus bogus’ moment

Watts Up With That?

Dr. Susan Crockford writes:

Regarding: Science self-corrects: bogus study claiming Roundup tolerant GMO corn causes cancer to be retracted

This ratty story reminds me of the polar bear incident I just posted about
this morning at PolarBearScience.

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Oh, What A Tangled Web We Weave ….. Arctic Ice Data Found!!! Confirms Steve Goddard’s Info

This variation is worse than we thought! Thanks

suyts space

 

Finally!!!!  This has been frustrating for me.  I once found some ice date going back to 1973.  This was a couple of years ago.  I hadn’t been able to locate it since.  I was looking for something different at the time, so I didn’t mark it. 

Readers of Steve’s Real Science will know that periodically he writes posts regarding the Arctic Sea ice prior to the 1978-1979 starting point most people see, because that’s what our public servant scientists always shows us.  Here’s a recent post of Steve’s in this regard.  And, here’s a graphic that he often uses, which is from the 1995 IPCC report.

image 

But, I’ve always wanted some hard numbers to back that up.  Remembering that I once saw said data, but, couldn’t find it again, has bothered me for a long time.  It’s been said, if you lose something, start doing what you were…

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Wind Chill and How it Can Affect You

TheSurvivalPlaceBlog

Wind chill is a measure of the combined effects of wind and temperature.  Temperature alone does not give a true indication of the impact of cold.  The human body loses heat through convection, evaporation, conduction, and radiation.  Wind chill has a direct affect on convection.  As your body surface heats the air around it, it forms an insulating layer of warm air against the surface.  Moving air or wind disrupts this layer, allowing for new, cooler air to replace the warm air against the surface.  The faster the wind speed, the quicker you lose heat and the faster the surface cools.

A wind chill chart will show you the affect that wind can have upon the human body and how fast it can cause you to lose heat.  As you will see from the following chart, it makes a big difference.wind chill

If wind chill is a problem, get out of the…

View original post 231 more words

Wind Chill and How it Can Affect You

TheSurvivalPlaceBlog

Wind chill is a measure of the combined effects of wind and temperature.  Temperature alone does not give a true indication of the impact of cold.  The human body loses heat through convection, evaporation, conduction, and radiation.  Wind chill has a direct affect on convection.  As your body surface heats the air around it, it forms an insulating layer of warm air against the surface.  Moving air or wind disrupts this layer, allowing for new, cooler air to replace the warm air against the surface.  The faster the wind speed, the quicker you lose heat and the faster the surface cools.

A wind chill chart will show you the affect that wind can have upon the human body and how fast it can cause you to lose heat.  As you will see from the following chart, it makes a big difference.wind chill

If wind chill is a problem, get out of the…

View original post 231 more words

Further Winter Thoughts

Image

Image N.A.S.A.

Rather than update my previous rambling, here’s some further thoughts on this winter and beyond [although I subscribe to WeatherAction these are my own independent thoughts, although they do rely on solar and lunar interactions. I put them out there so I can look back and see if they have any merit].

Firstly it’s interesting that many forecasters went with a mild November. I didn’t see that at all Continue reading

7.0 magnitude earthquake strikes South Atlantic: strongest to ever hit region

The Extinction Protocol

South Atlantic 7.0
November 25, 2013SOUTH ATLANTICA magnitude-7.0earthquake has struck in the South Atlantic, southeast of the disputed Falkland Islands, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). It says the quake struck at 2-27 a.m. on Monday (0627 GMT), about 195 miles southeast of the Falklands’ capital, Stanley, and 545 miles east of Ushuaia, Argentina. The depth was a shallow 6.2 miles. The Falklands are a British territory that is claimed by Argentina. The USGS says the quake followed four others that all measured more than 5.0, over a two-hour period leading up to the big quake. It says such quakes are uncommon in the region. Only 15 quakes of more than magnitude 5.0 had been measured in the region in the previous 40 years. –The Hindu

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Comet Ison: Could a break up pose a threat to Earth?

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Comet Ison makes solar approach on Thursday, passing a mere 720,000 miles from the solar surface. It’ll get hot. This could cause a break-up, with fragments then heading on as yet unpredictable trajectories. Could this pose a threat to Earth? Stuart Clark at the Guardian has the following obs:

Comet-011If it survives an encounter with the sun this week, comet Ison will put on an impressive early morning display in the run-up to Christmas. But anyone hoping for a Bethlehem-style celestial sign on the big day will be disappointed. By then the comet will probably be too faint to see with a naked eye.

Ison is currently speeding towards a fiery encounter on Thursday, which could destroy it. It will pass 720,000 miles above the solar surface, 130 times closer than our planet ever reaches.

The intense sunlight will heat the comet to about 2,700C, speeding up its evaporation. In…

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Michael Kelly: The CRU Mails – anatomy of Climategate

The Arab proverb ‘My brother and I against my cousin ; my cousin and I against the stranger’ comes to mind as does Blackadder teling Baldrick to deny everything. I know if I had engaged in such behaviour at work I’d be at Her Majesties pleasure (us mortals not being afforded a get out of jail card).

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Hat tip to Geoff Chambers and Tom Nelson for alerting us to this gem hidden away on archive.org. A the beginnings of  plot for a film about the Climategate emailS plus background research by Michael Kelly. It’s very long, and I’m reblogging it here so it doesn’t get lost. Dip in and enjoy.

PDF of this article with external links is here (320k)

The CRU Mails
by Michael Kelly

yamal-larchLike an Aristophanes satire, like Hamlet, it opens with two slaves, spear-carriers, little people. Footsoldiers of history, two researchers in a corrupt and impoverished mid-90s Russia schlep through the tundra to take core samples from trees at the behest of the bigger fish in far-off East Anglia. Stepan and Rashit don’t even have their own e-mail address and like characters in some absurdist comedy must pass jointly under the name of Tatiana M. Dedkova. Conscientious and obliging, they strike a human…

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Behind the SKS Curtain

Climate Audit

As a preamble and reprise, I think that it is reasonable for Cowtan and Way to take exception with HadCRU’s failure to estimate temperature in Arctic gridcells and to propose methods for estimating this temperature. At a time when the climate community argued that differences between the major indices and accessibility to CRU data didn’t “matter”, I thought that both mattered. One of the reasons for transparency in CRU data and methods was so that interested parties could carry out their own assessments, as Cowtan and Way have done. They have diagnosed a downward bias in recent HadCRU results. On previous occasions, I’ve observed that the community is more alert to errors that go the “wrong way” than to errors that go the “right way” and this opinion remains unchanged. As noted in my previous post, it doesn’t appear to me that their slight upward revision in temperature estimates has…

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