Watch “Milo Clubs The BBC to Death … Again”

This is actually quite brutal. The poor interviewer could hardly get a word in 😱😂

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Cassini captures wave structure in Saturn rings

Stunning

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Image credit: NASA
We now know that Saturn’s rings share a process with spiral galaxies, and the unique co-orbital pattern of two of its moons get some attention.

This view from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows a wave structure in Saturn’s rings known as the Janus 2:1 spiral density wave, reports Phys.org.

Resulting from the same process that creates spiral galaxies, spiral density waves in Saturn’s rings are much more tightly wound.

In this case, every second wave crest is actually the same spiral arm which has encircled the entire planet multiple times. This is the only major density wave visible in Saturn’s B ring.

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Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Some Pythagorean triples [credit: Cmglee / Wikipedia]
Could Babylonian base-60 maths be about to make a comeback? The tablet has been dated to between 1822 and 1762 BC and is based on Pythagorean triples, as Phys.org reports. It uses ‘a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles’.

UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.

The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry – the study of triangles – by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been hidden until now.

Known as Plimpton 322, the small tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now…

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Norway’s Washout Summer, Farmers Despair at rain, rain, rain

If it’s 97% it must be a consensus 😉

WeatherAction News

Despite the early heatwave it has been for the most part an increasingly poor wet summer, highlighted best by the Central England Temperatures which have been going down;

Further north, it has of course been far wetter, however nothing like in Western Norway where it’s been very wet in some places for 70 out of 72 (97%!) days as the Jetstream has increasingly taken a sojourn over Northwestern Europe.

Winds at 250hpa. Image courtesy earth.nullschool.net

Norway has indeed had a poor summer;

Read the full story here

Full story

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Voyager spacecraft still reaching for the stars and setting records after 40 years

Great story

Tallbloke's Talkshop


These two 1977 vintage machines really are ‘cosmic overachievers’ as this Phys.org report calls them. Voyager 1 reached interstellar space in 2012, but the last science instrument is not due to be switched off until 2030.

Humanity’s farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, achieve 40 years of operation and exploration this August and September.

Despite their vast distance, they continue to communicate with NASA daily, still probing the final frontier. Their story has not only impacted generations of current and future scientists and engineers, but also Earth’s culture, including film, art and music.

Each spacecraft carries a Golden Record of Earth sounds, pictures and messages. Since the spacecraft could last billions of years, these circular time capsules could one day be the only traces of human civilization.

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National Grid’s Thoughts on EVs

Let’s spend all our money and hope some magically appears from nowhere because otherwise we’re ******

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

image

forecourt-thoughts-v10.pdf

The National Grid has recently published what it calls a Thought Piece about the impact of electric cars on the electricity system.

It is not a hard and fast plan, but rather a bit of blue sky thinking. But it is certainly worth reading, not least because it only runs to five pages!

It starts by laying out the background:

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Fishy peer review at Science, by citizen scientist Ted Held

For Better Science

Sweden and the international research community recently faced yet another research misconduct scandal. It was about a Science paper by Oona Lönnstedt and Peter Eklöv, which in 2016 made worldwide headlines with its findings that young fish larvae (or fry), namely Eurasian perch, would eat up plastic pollution like teenagers eat fast food. It soon turned out the research was apparently never performed as described, the original data was missing (allegedly stored only on a laptop, which was then stolen from a car), the results likely made up. The Lönnstedt & Eklöv 2016 paper received an editorial expression of concern in December 2016 and was eventually retracted on May 26th 2017 following misconduct findings by the Swedish Central Ethics Review Board (CEPN), while the two Swedish whistleblowers Josefin Sundin and Fredrik Jutfelt, initially themselves stiffly criticised by the University of Uppsala, were finally exonerated (see panel verdict here

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