National Grid’s Thoughts on EVs

Let’s spend all our money and hope some magically appears from nowhere because otherwise we’re ******

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

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forecourt-thoughts-v10.pdf

The National Grid has recently published what it calls a Thought Piece about the impact of electric cars on the electricity system.

It is not a hard and fast plan, but rather a bit of blue sky thinking. But it is certainly worth reading, not least because it only runs to five pages!

It starts by laying out the background:

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Fishy peer review at Science, by citizen scientist Ted Held

For Better Science

Sweden and the international research community recently faced yet another research misconduct scandal. It was about a Science paper by Oona Lönnstedt and Peter Eklöv, which in 2016 made worldwide headlines with its findings that young fish larvae (or fry), namely Eurasian perch, would eat up plastic pollution like teenagers eat fast food. It soon turned out the research was apparently never performed as described, the original data was missing (allegedly stored only on a laptop, which was then stolen from a car), the results likely made up. The Lönnstedt & Eklöv 2016 paper received an editorial expression of concern in December 2016 and was eventually retracted on May 26th 2017 following misconduct findings by the Swedish Central Ethics Review Board (CEPN), while the two Swedish whistleblowers Josefin Sundin and Fredrik Jutfelt, initially themselves stiffly criticised by the University of Uppsala, were finally exonerated (see panel verdict here

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Perverse Postmodern Climate: Retreat from Reason

Science Matters

The recent marches for science were an amazing irony: People actually think that science is a matter of protesting in the streets. It was a demonstration all right, a full-throated display of postmodern contempt for reason, especially as embodied in the scientific method.

This virus has already taken over many universities, the most extreme case being Evergreen State College in Eastern Washington. Black students decided there should be a No White day on campus to protest the history of blacks mistreatment. One professor refused and tried to hold his class, arguing that free speech was not a matter of race, creed, gender or anything else. A riot erupted against him and his students, shutting down the class.

Afterward, the Evergreen State Faculty Turned on the Professor, Saying He ‘Endangered’ Students

This post is to call attention to a war correspondent issuing a recent report on the state of this cultural…

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Arctic Ice Song: Hey June, Don’t Let Me Down

Science Matters

The Iceberg Festival takes place every June on the Great Northern Peninsula, Newfoundland, now underway.

Weather Canada Iceberg Bulletin
Issued 11:00 AM EDT 2 June 2017

Special ice warning in effect.
Bergy water except 7 tenths of first-year ice including a trace of
old ice in the northern section. Unusual presence of sea ice.

Iceberg Count
More than 100 icebergs

East Coast Newfoundland Sea Ice 2016 and 2017.

Arctic ice had a remarkable May. The April NH ice extent in April was a 343k km2 deficit below the decadal average, and May ended with a monthly average surplus of 131k km2. The graph below shows in recent weeks how 2017 took a lead of ~300k km2 above average and is holding it entering June.

On June 1, this year’s ice extent is running 280k km2 above average, and a full 1M higher than 2016. Out of the last twelve years, only…

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Study finds a natural cause for early 20th century Arctic warming – but kowtows to CO2 in the present

Climate models do a poor job of simulating the reconstructed record of circulation change…. Climate model ensembles show limited power to predict multidecadal variation in [Pacific North American pattern] over the period of our record, raising questions about their potential to project future hydroclimatic change modulated by this circulation pattern.

Bob Tisdale has said as much many, many times before.

Watts Up With That?

From the universities of Kyoto & San Diego comes this old tired catchphrase, along with a polar bear picture to go with the press release.

Is a warmer Arctic a canary of global warming?

Kyoto University and UCSD uncover a cause for the warming in the Arctic in the early 20th century.
CREDIT Kyoto University

Since the 1970s the northern polar region has warmed faster than global averages by a factor or two or more, in a process of ‘Arctic amplification’ which is linked to a drastic reduction in sea ice.

But then how to explain a similar rapid warming that occurred during the early 20th century, when the effects of greenhouse gases were considerably weaker than today? And what can we prove about the period, given the scarcity of usable data and observations prior to the 1950s?

Now scientists from Kyoto University and UC San Diego have discovered that…

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Letter To The Telegraph

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

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Heads up for the Telegraph, who have published my letter in response to the one below from Ben Goldsmith:

SIR – Charles Moore couldn’t have got it more wrong in writing that climate change fears are elitist and limited to those in metropolitan areas.

MPs up and down the country report increasing numbers of constituents raising this issue with them. There is in fact huge public backing for action on climate change, and in particular support for energy efficiency and renewables.

Moreover, it is a myth that climate policies are driving up energy bills: wind and gas are now demonstrably the cheapest sources of electricity in Britain. Bill-payers are better off as a result of green policy measures which drive greater efficiency. And, ultimately, our economy is stronger because of the world-leading contribution our country makes to green industries.

As we leave the European Union, we must…

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Massive asteroid impact crater in Falklands linked with Great Dying mass extinction

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Credit: worldatlas.com
Something new for geologists to get their teeth into.

The Falkland Islands may be home to one of the world’s largest craters, reports the IB Times. A new analysis has revealed it has many characteristics of an asteroid impact and may date back to the ‘Great Dying’ extinction event.

About 200 similar large craters have been discovered so far on Earth but there are many other examples of them on other planets including on Venus, Mercury and Mars.

The Falkland Islands structure, which is described in detail in the journal Terra Nova, has a diameter measuring approximately 250 kilometres (150 miles). If it turns out to be an impact crater, this size would make it one of Earth’s largest – comparable to the famous Chicxulub crater discovered in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico nearly four decades ago.

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Indian Impacts: Diamonds of the Gods

An excellent read Tim.

MalagaBay

Geology is a very ambivalent belief system.

On the one hand:

The discovery of stishovite at the Kachchh (Luna) site in India has helped convinced some geologists they’re dealing with an meteorite impact even though the dimple doesn’t display the necessary depth to diameter ratio to qualify as a meteorite impact from above.

This site appears to be a unique site in the world, as it lacks the characteristics of a typical impact site. Conventionally measured depth to diameter ratio is dismally low.

X-ray analysis of the materials adhering to meteorite fragments carried out by Dr George Mathew, Earth Science Department, the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay reveal stishovite and coesite, the high pressure polymorphs of sllica, which confirms the impact origin of the crater.

The Unusual Impact Crater of Luna In Kachchh, Western India
R V Karan – Jour Geol Soc India – Vol 68 –…

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